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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to get anything going and that's the way to deal with the deficits, of course. and there were some measures there. no national insurance payments for employees for the first few thousand pounds reducing corporation tax earlier to 20%. infrastructure spending, could it be more? businesses would always want more. but there was acknowledgement he tried while keeping the next fiscally neutral. on the whole, businesses say, not bad, could have done more. i think that will be the summation for them. the key factor, of course, is if you're not going to do more to stimulate your own growth, what happens to the eurozone becomes even more important. and i did speak to the chancellor, george osborne, just a short while ago and i asked him how worried is he about what's going on in cypress? this is what he had to say. >> it is a worrying situation in cypress and i think there's been some sole rans in international markets and elsewhere that they've got to sort these problems out. but obviously, we now need a solution. if i would have concerns if these depositors, less than a hundred thousand e
account deficits, we're not shipping as much joe seas? >> when people think of the economic situations, they think of the u.s. but what it will do, it will cut into the u.s. deficit and it will cut into the chinese surplus. and you ask the average economist for the last three or four years before the crisis, during the crisis, after the crisis, what's the global economic problem, number one, the answer probably isn't microimbalances. trade surplus in the u.s., trade surplus and china. what i didn't know is that still more than half of the u.s. deficit of goods and services is energy imports. >> and that's going to go away? >> as things are going, that might be going away. at the same time, china surplus will suffer from the tracing of independence of china. >> that's strong dollar weak yuan. becky. >> just an observation. >> first, tight oil, i haven't heard of this before. i know where the marcellus shale fields are. where is tight oil? is it in the same sort of locations? >> same. traditionally, coming out of gas yields because of this huge different between gas and oil prices. which
that the republicans are a little bit too root canal, a little bit too debt-obsessed, a little bit too deficit-obsessed and don't talk about the economy and jobs, which polls still show are the number-one issue. >> yeah, they've got to go back to reagan and jack kemp to stop acting like consequence at this pated accountants and get focused on what makes this economy grow. and the way you get revenues, not by raising taxes, by growth. if we had normal growth rates, we would get another 4 or 500 billion right off the bat. that's what they should focus on. all a means to an end. on social security, stop coming across that you're going to, you know, do something to grandma and instead talk about the idea, which they haven't, they don't touch it, of having accounts for young people with proper controls where they own the fruits of their labor, not washington politicians. make it positive instead of this -- as you say, root canal, that was more graphic. >> i think that -- i don't want to get -- i want to talk about the corporate tax, but i want to add to this, i think in a sense obama was right. and
need to do it in a way that both stabilizes our deficit and debt, makes critical investments in growing our economy and preserves the core of the programs on which americans rely. this is not just about numbers. it is also about values. it is also about priorities. >> sreenivasan: republican jeff sessions of alabamaĆ§Ć³ called democrats out for how they were using the word balance during the debate. >> they're also using the word balance. they hope people will hear it and think that this means they have a balanced budget. they know they don't have a balanced budget. they won't tell the american people they don't have one. they just use the word. but it's not in their document. >> sreenivasan: sessions forced a vote on an amendment to put democrats on record in opposition to balancing the budget by the end of the decade. it failed on a near-party line vote. lawmakers in north dakota moved to outlaw abortion today. the republican-controlled legislature passed a bill defining life as starting at conception. it is one in a series of anti- abortion measures that have passed this year. the bi
up by the fed money printing. our deficit is as well as it makings it cheaper for poll tish shuns to borrow. former representative ron paul says why the fed is addicted to the this. you don't want to miss ron paul coming up. lauren: despite the cyprus scare, our next guest says they offer good investments. he will tell you which ones to buy. his answers certainly surprised me. lauren: time for a quick speed read of some of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute of the first up, general motors recalling 34,000 vehicles to fix transmissions. recall affects 2013 buick lacrosse and cadillac srx crossover models. >>> u.s. crude oil production set to pass imports for the first time in 18 years. the gap between monthly oil production and imports is projected to be nearly two million barrels per day by 2014. >>> neiman marcus settles with the federal trade commission after claiming its products were made with faux fur when they contained real fur. it prohibits the retailer from violating those laws for 20 years. >>> total number of mortgage applications subpoena applied for i
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
of the federal deficit should be the top priority for congress this year. 52% say immigration reform is a top issue. 42% say new gun control policies are the most important issues. and 33% say efforts to combat climate change should be the priority. >> 7:08. we know what sal's priority is keeping a close eye on traffic. >> okay. right now we are looking at a community much better than it was yesterday. we have slow downs obviously. let's take a look at the bay bridge. earlier minor crash. didn't last for too long. but the metering lights were turned on and slowed down for a bit. so it's a little worse than it normally is. backed up to the mc arthur maze. 30-35 minute delay. if there are no other problems on the bridge, this will begin to wind out and by 8:00 see an improvement. this morning's commute has been busy on 880 between hayward and fremont. we're talking about the livermore valley as well. westbound 580 slowing coming in over the pass. but no problems into castro valley. let's go to steve. >> thank you. mostly clear. patchy low clouds. they are going north to south. they'll eventuall
'll be a while, in other words. dagen: it will be a while, but the good news is the budget deficit is actually declining. suggesting a decline for the next three years, so there's a little bit of time in washington to get it right. it is not as imminent, you have not done sequestration, but it is still the fed, all about the fed. what the market will be focused on is not so much when they will raise rates because that is forever into the future, but will they be skimming back the 85 billion in purchases? i don't think there will be any sign that will happen. i think it is helping the economy. connell: you agree with the policy? >> i agree with the policy, but what is propping up the stock market is the better economy. and i cannot attribute that alter the fed. a lot of people don't think the fed is doing very effective, think it works a little, but housing is coming back certain the fed is helping that, jobs, business investment more than just the fed, that is a general improvement in the overall economy, there's no question the fed kept at it. but there is more to it than just the fed. connel
we go deficit reduction. you saw minutes 6-3. there was expectation we had noises out from tucker that perhaps there might have been a bigger number voting for qe. what we will look at today is to see what osbourne does with the bank of england and there's a bunch of things he might do from amending the target, inflation target to changing the bank of england act saying we'll put in a jewel mandate. that may be more of a focus than anything he says about borrowing figures and growth numbers. >> absolutely. you can look at the sterling reaction here, ross. we're spiking above 151 now on the back of those minutes. melanie, over to you. i guess investors would have liked to see hints of a more accommodative bank of england here during the last meeting. might there not be more of a policy shift under way perhaps as ross said related to even changing the mandate? >> in terms of what we're expecting today, we do think that it might be the more interesting of the budget to watch. i wouldn't expect any big changes today. i think what he may do is announce a review of the policy fra framew
taxes, it would curb spending by repealing obama care and eliminate the deficit in ten years. $4.6 trillion in cuts. zero chance of passing in the democratic-controlled senate, it's dead on arrival. >> lawmakers in the house and senate approved legislation to fund the government through the end of september. that avoids the risk of a partial federal shutdown. in the process, they are on spring break for a couple weeks. what's your take on this? >> my take is the whole financial dysfunction of our congress is mind blow iing. you look at this week. let's say frederick, maryland, where there's air traffic control that will be shut. a tower that was built by the stimulus money. so stimulus money went into this tower. the government saying it's a priority. and the the government because of its dysfunction saying we have to shut is down. that's a perfect representation, i think, of how washington is not doing its job. we can't even pass a budget. it can't even run the books. there's no strategy. when you look at some of the spending cuts, you see a lack of a strategy in american financ
. hold on, mercedes, let's acknowledge what has happened, the deficits have dropped now for 3 straight years at a rate lower -- faster pace than we have seen since the end of world war ii. nobody wants to acknowledge that. but they are coming down because we did have to engage in emergency spenning when the chitanked and we are coming out of that. we have to have balance -- that's good. but what is really good is job creation and a strong economy. we are seeing the effects of austerity. they would trade our economy for theirs in a success. in realtime, as consequence of austerity. >> what do we do? 85% of americans want to see a balanced budget. we are not even anywhere near that with these plans? >> unfortunately, i think when you look at basic fact of the two budget proposals, we are so far apart and we need leadership from the president. we are able to find out what the president's march madness 56 are before we -- before he unveils his budget. again, i think that it really comes -- from president obama to take a lead, to keep meeting with republicans and enable to try to bring the
anything intelligent with our budget deficit. so the logical default currency is gold. we had a lull in european problems, but thanks to a lack of regulation -- how else did cyprus get out of hand, especially if the same thing happened in iceland, the lull is over. i think this is one more reminder rich europeans will switch from keeping europe owes in banks to keeping gold in deposit boxes. if you have no exposure to gold, buy some now. sure, most europeans may keep their money in the bank. they live there, that's their life. but the wealthy are looking to pull out money over time and the big beneficiary will be gold. amazingly, the european regulators can't help themselves. their incredible incompetencies makes buying gold the easiest decision in the world. these idiots are the gift that climpgs the gold buy every time they take action and this latest action may be the best when it comes to pushing gold higher than maybe since the reign of the former european central banker chief jean, "the fraud" trichet. carfirmation. only hertz gives you a carfirmation. hey, this is challenger.
, to balance the budget, no pressure to wind down these immense deficits, because they can be financed at about nothing. so to companies that might properly be considered bankruptcy candidates can sustain themselves and their precarious lives through borrowing at such rates. >> and that's what we continue seeing. >> this so-called recovery has been painfully and in a very un-american way drawn out, undynamic, and to people who are looking for a job, downright cool. and the fed insists that for reasons of economics as well as humanity, it will continue to do what has not worked. >> and i want to get your take on cyprus and europe, but let me put that aside for a moment. because, you know, chairman ben bernanke commented on this yesterday. someone said to him, what about the downside risk of all of this easy money. and he said, look, there are no issues of inflation. we don't have any issues in terms of, you know, this free money so far. and in fact, it's been helpful to the economy. so, what is the downside risk? how does this end? >> well, this is the greatest and most perilous experiment in th
on the possible deficit reduction deal. hi, john. >> it's an interesting blend of confrontation and cooperation. call it a controlled battle because you've got the u.s. senate today taking up a bill to avert a government shutdown by sustaining government funding beyond march 27th. the house has already passed the bill. there are differences between the two chambers and the two parties on what they want to do to the effects of the the bill. it smoothed out some things. made it easier for the pentagon to adjust. the senate has other departments which it's trying to help. still some disagreements there. but they expect to be worked out by the end of the week. at the same time, there's a huge gap between the two long-term budget plans that the two parties are pushing. and john boehner over the weekend said, we're done with tax increases. he was repeating that position. the house white house responded, the senior adviser, saying no deal is possible as long as john boehner is in that place. so that's where we are, sue. you've got on the one hand the two parties working together. they are like my to a
exaggerated by looking at year to date, a boon. the boon right now, at a 56 basis point deficit to the treasuries. that's a wide spread. and the last two-day chart of the euro versus the dollar. should it break through 1.28.80, it could challenge the current four-month lows versus the greenback. sue, back to you. >> rick, thank you very much. >>> some new clues about the state of the job market today. the number of americans filing unemployment benefits rising slightly last week to 336,000. a tad below estimates. we've seen a number of job cuts announced recently. so is the labor market running out of steam? listen to what "mad money's" jim cramer said earlier today. >> tens of thousands of people are going to be laid off within the next month. >> whatever little. >> and that's going to show up in the numbers, in that 330,000 employment, that may be the last good one. bernanke is not smoking dope, pot, whatever they call it now. >> well, is he right? joining us now is "the wall street journal's" chief economics correspondent john hillsenrath. good to see you. >> good to be here.
-term debt and recovered the budget deficit. detroit is the largest u.s. city ever put under state control. those are your headlines. i am lauren reed. back to connell. connell: a move lower in stocks. we have noticed some of the french banks. they are all down. dagen: a snowstorm that dumped as much as 2 feet in the northwest. connell: i would rather be over in cyprus. >> good morning. we are tracking it again. parts of illinois being hit with as much as 15 inches of snow. it is as far west as parts of indiana. the highest snowfall totals should be a foot of snow. we do have winter storm warnings in effect. it is because of the wind and snowfall amounts. we actually have been seeing some delays. they are about an hour or so. you could see four-6 inches of snow out here. the central appellations and most of these warnings should expire by tomorrow. that is what we think the storm system will pull out of the northeast leaving behind some quieter conditions. connell: that sounds, well, all right. dagen: tom kloza is coming up with a big addiction on gasoline prices. he says you will save mon
that deficit with the daily impact. you kind of hurt that a little bit and what the president living in that abc news interview as well. is that a new track for the democrats. >> first, they went too far with the fears of armageddon. the democrats overplayed their hand. on the other hand, it is the case that the ordinary american is in having a better life in their parents. they are worried about reform plans. they are uncertain and they are nervous. dagen: $17 trillion debt, the average american is not having the impact on the lives. >> i am disagreeing. the democrats overplayed their hand with fear. we have tepid economic growth. we are not seeing the revitalization of the economy on main street. connell: regular people -- >> so-called great rotation into stocks from bonds has not really happened to the degree people expected. a lot of ordinary people who were heavily invested in mutual funds have not come back. connell: doug, thank you. dagen: watch out for rising interest rates. that will be pain that everybody feels. speaking of rising interest rates and the housing market and h
. cyprus needed a total bail out of 17 billion euros and they needed to to fund their banks and deficit. they said we will only give you ten and you have to come up with the other seven. it led to runs on atms in cyprus and protests as the president arrived at parliament. here's what they decided to do. they're going to tax bank depos sxits the ox original plan on saturday, 10% if you have an account larger than 100,000 euros and here's what led to the protests, 6.75% if you're under 100,000 euros and that's fdic deposit insurance. market watchers were aghast that insured depositors would be hit, but the insurance was essentially a falsehood. what if citizens in italy or spain begin to think that they being lose their money even if it is supposedly insured? could that lead to bank runs? it is so controversial the cyprus parliament couldn't get it passed yesterday. they say they would do it today. it didn't happen and now they're trying for tomorrow. they are re-working the plan so the smaller guy is not hit so hard, but still, it appears they're going after insured deposits. why did the
a surplus of politics and deficit of intelligence when it comes to this. germans and fins and a number of others feel they have to tell very uninformed electorate that they are being tough. we have to extract some blood. they don't understand that this is a two pointed sword. by trying to extract blood from greeks sand cypriots they are inflicting enormous pain. $500 billion worth of capitalization around the world wiped out. >> as moronic as this plan was, we've heard there are not a lot of options. >> there are options. >> first of all, they should be putting in place the equivalent of the fdic. when we close a failed bank in the united states, we go in on a friday with fdic and occ. it's all hush hush. you close the bank. you move the depositors money into a good bank and you don't lose faith in the banking system. >> don't they need 27 countries to put that in their charter? >> this is what europe was moving toward. this is what was recognized this past summer and this is why -- >> we knew it would take time. >> this throws that out the window and the thing is that they're not sayi
to approximately 5 billion euros. because then all your financing are the government deficits. >> adam, thank you so much. >> my pleasure. >> becky, you highlight a really good point. what is very clear from this government and also from the people on the ground that i've spoken with is they absolutely don't want to see a reduction in the sides of the banking system here because they know that is what 50% of the economy and a ton of the jobs, as well. they realize it's going to be a change of livelihood. changes that will happen in this country no matter what are going to be startling to the people here. >> i saw all the headlines coming from russia and the president here making strong comments. is that going to fall on deaf ears in europe? is that not a big deal as far as they're concerned? >> that would be my interpretation, absolutely. would you agree with that, adam? whatever russia says is going to fall on deaf ears when it comes to the troika? >> it doesn't fall on deaf ears. but the europeans have made a categoric statements. cypress has to come up with 5.8 billion euros. it can't be throu
deficit. we're spending a trillion more than we take in every year. everything has to be on the table. one thing i would suggest is that there are tipping points to everything. in the middle class segment people between $100,000 to $250,000 in home purchase price, mortgage interest makes sense to the middle class borrowers. and the question is do they count that when they look to buy a home versus rent. people stopping buying altogether. if it has an impact, how does that impact construction? has to be on the table. it has to be something we take in context with the broader picture. >> help us get rid of freddie and fannie some day too. put something together for me, will you? >> keep in mind, while we sit around and vilify freddie and fannie. >> see you love them. that's a shock. >> i don't. i think we ought to go away from them. but we need liquidity to ensure there's capital. >> can't do it now. especially now. all right. great hair. good looking man. and you watch, unlike some other people that work here. anyway, thanks, dave. >> you may not watch for a few minutes when you walk to get
if rates were liar. they had the time because rates were so much lower and deficit was going up slower. in a real sense the fed buying the treasuries has made it less painful for the government. >> i'm not sure if the population that chairs the euro or those that chair somewhat with central planning with regard to the 27 countries, but my question to you is i'm not sure we're going to lose any of these countries, but on the other hand, keeping their funding and the central bankers and the banks and insolvency all in line is a full -time job. is anybody worried about how we're growing these economies? is that the rally big elephant in the room? >> the growth hasn't phone zone up. we talked about it many times. what is the eventual exit strategy? our fed can't decide when to stop buying treasuries much less strengthen the balance sheet. >> i talked to jim bianco about the taper. this is another arena where the fed is going to paint themselves into a corner, they're going to move them up and down with every data point? in the end, they just have to say enough is enough, don't they? >> goi
the deficit while 38% said, spending should be increased to boost job creation. tracy: hmmm. how about that? all right, joining us with more on this bill passed today that peter barnes was just referencing too and americans feeling on the economy, congressman marsha blackburn. thanks for being with us today. start with the continuing resolution. here we go again, kicking the can down the road, buying some time. we'll be back to square one in a couple months. then what? >> i'll tell you at least what we have is a continuing resolution that recognizes the reductions that were made, the spending reductions that were made through sequestration. so that is, that's a good, a good solid step. with the budget, we have passed ours in the house. it will be the first time in several years for the senate to actually pass a budget. i guess they want their paychecks next month. and then, you know, tracy, let's see what comes forward as we try to working is out. they continue to say balanced approach but i'll tell you, i think the american people, there in your fox poll are exactly right. you have to get
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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